Author Topic: The CUB CLUB  (Read 173683 times)

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Offline Kenneth23763

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #650 on: May 08, 2018, 08:45:30 AM »
Rob

Thanks for the reply.
I hadn't considered the spacevan so will check out weight.

I am conscious of weights as I currently have an VW alltrack which with a 90kg towball weight is useless so I'll be looking at a new tug.

I got rid of the Pajero because I didn't need a large 4WD and liked the idea of 5.5l/100km rather that the 12l/100km I was getting.  In hindsight a really stupid decision!  But that's okay apparently I make a lot of those. :-[
Ken

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Offline RJ

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #651 on: June 23, 2018, 04:15:30 PM »
Hi Robbo and Ray,

I was wondering the same thing about my new Brumby and the scissor-jack. The "instructions" supplied by Cub tell me all sorts of stuff except anything about tyre-changing. I tried using the scissor-jack on the axle, but the cut-out on the supplied jack doesn't fit too well. Any thoughts, or should I do as Ray has done and use a different jack?

Cheers,
TDB

I have a cub Brumby as well and also find that the supplied scissor jack does not fit to well on the independant suspesion arm as well. The cuttout on the jack seem to be for fitting leaf spring model according to instructions on the rectangular chassis member. Does anyone have any suggestions or know if this may be the wrong jack for the independant suspension.

Offline jaup

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #652 on: September 20, 2018, 02:08:41 PM »
Hi,

We are currently considering a Cub Traveler, we currently have a Jayco and have decided a Cub would suit us better.

I have a quick question, that I can hope the collective knowledge here can help me out with.

I am aware the Transcontinental Pack comes standard with Traveller now, and I was wonder what the scope/limit of use for this level of camper is. I am thinking that at some stage we would do some trips like the Oodnadatta track  (which I've done once before), heading to Birdsville and maybe do a lap of Australia. Would this camper cope with this, whilst obviously being sensible with speeds etc?

We are not really into crazy 4wd tracks etc, this use would more included extended outback travel on unsealed roads etc.

Also, at this time we are probably going to buy one new. But I was curious if there any previous, but recent models that are close to traveller, that we could look at on the second hand market?

Thanks all

Cheers
Paul

Offline outbackogre

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #653 on: September 20, 2018, 02:34:43 PM »
As far as I know, the TCP provided some upgrades that assisted touring (chassis strength, water tank and gas bottle size), but it retained the slipper leaf spring suspension from the basic on-road model.  This is fine for flat roads but corrugations and holes might test it's limits (of course, speed and tyre pressures are also significant factors).  Speaking of tyres, the TCP may have 14 inch wheels, which will limit tyre options if you want something tougher.  The Cub offroad models have 15 or 16 inch rims.  You may find that there are different options for suspension and tyre size (especially if buying new).  I've had a couple of Cubs and would advise those heading off the black top to go with the galvanized chassis.
My friends call me Rob.  You can call me ... Rob!
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Offline jaup

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #654 on: September 20, 2018, 02:56:34 PM »
As far as I know, the TCP provided some upgrades that assisted touring (chassis strength, water tank and gas bottle size), but it retained the slipper leaf spring suspension from the basic on-road model.  This is fine for flat roads but corrugations and holes might test it's limits (of course, speed and tyre pressures are also significant factors).  Speaking of tyres, the TCP may have 14 inch wheels, which will limit tyre options if you want something tougher.  The Cub offroad models have 15 or 16 inch rims.  You may find that there are different options for suspension and tyre size (especially if buying new).  I've had a couple of Cubs and would advise those heading off the black top to go with the galvanized chassis.


Hi,

Thanks for the reply.

The current Traveller comes with a drawbar upgrade, silent winch, leaf shackle spring suspension, 15” wheels and a galvanized chassis.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2018, 03:00:18 PM by jaup »

Offline outbackogre

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #655 on: September 20, 2018, 03:28:24 PM »
Sounds fine to me.  I reckon that would be adequate for the use you've indicated.
My friends call me Rob.  You can call me ... Rob!
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Offline Diamonds

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #656 on: September 23, 2018, 10:51:44 AM »
Hi guys,

My 2001 Cub Drover off road is up on gumtree as of now.  PM if interested.  I still cant get the photos to upload on here otherwise would also poston this forum.

Have a good one 

Offline speewa158

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #657 on: September 27, 2018, 08:05:09 AM »
My Supermatic Escape  has yet again followed me on our last trip of 22000Ks or so . We traveled from
Nagambie
Quilpie
Boulia
Plenty Hwy
Gemtree
Litchfield Nat park
Kununurra
Mataranka
The Savannah Way { dirt )
Cooktown
Cairns
Chillagoe
Herberton
Savannah Way ( black top )
Normanton   ( 2nd time )
South home to Nagambie  .
Apart from 2 tyres that let go with a bang & a dust cap that departed stuffing the bearings . The trip went well . Got to love the Cub               :cup:                           :cheers:


You can go your own way . Treg Up & Make Dust

Offline Rowlie

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #658 on: September 29, 2018, 08:28:22 AM »
Not to mention Lorella Springs and Adels Grove. Hope you found a can opener for the rear door. Glad you made it home safely. P

Offline speewa158

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #659 on: September 29, 2018, 10:16:06 AM »
Lorella Springs  put a black marker pen over that place on the map so l never have to hear its name mentioned again   >:D >:D
You can go your own way . Treg Up & Make Dust

Offline Uncletoby

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #660 on: October 19, 2018, 11:35:44 AM »
Long time lurker, first time poster here.
I gave it a lot of thought over the years and finally decided we're going to purchase a late 90s or early 2000s Supamatic for our family of three. We currently camp in a canvas tent and have heaps of fun, but it's time to move on to something that is more flexible and requires less time to set up. I did some research but cannot find the differences between the 'plain' Supamatic, LX, GK, Regal and escape models back then. Does anyone know the answer?

My current car, a European AWD wagon, has a severely restricted tow ball download allowance which i believe rules out an off-road model. We usually go camping in National and state parks and travel through plenty of corrugated dirt roads so a semi off road model would be better suited to us. Now, I spend quite a bit of time looking around on Gumtree and noticed that some -but not all- non-off road Supamatics seem to have a very low clearance and the wheels appear to be more inward (shorter axle or wider body?).  I've attached a few photos courtesy of google to illustrate what I mean. Does that mean for every Supamatic model (LX, Escape, etc..) there are 3 versions, being the off road, semi-off road and on-road only?

I'm hoping to be able to post photos of a trip in our first camper trailer very soon  :laugh:

Offline speewa158

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #661 on: October 20, 2018, 04:44:19 AM »
Uncletoby  Welcome to the Cub Club & now hook up to make dust  . Your fun has really just begun               :cup:                                    :cheers:
You can go your own way . Treg Up & Make Dust

Offline Diamonds

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #662 on: October 27, 2018, 08:18:48 AM »
Hi Uncletoby,

I cant answer your specific questions about models, but
It sounds like we were in the same situation.

I had a Honda CRV with a single axle trailer towball limit of 100kgs.  I bought a 2001 Cud Drover which is an offroad model coming in at 160kgs.  I then had it modified to moved the spare up and on the back corner, removed the battery from the drawbar and shuffled some other things to get it a mickey hair under.

It added 5 mins to set up as Id remove spare from top and bike chain it to one wheel, where it acted as a nuisance value wheel clamp.

If you PM me a mobile no I can send you a photo or two.  I just removed mine from gumtree as I am still undecided if I really want to sell it (or at least for the offers I received). 

Offline Uncletoby

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #663 on: November 08, 2018, 08:29:12 PM »
Hi Uncletoby,

I cant answer your specific questions about models, but
It sounds like we were in the same situation.

I had a Honda CRV with a single axle trailer towball limit of 100kgs.  I bought a 2001 Cud Drover which is an offroad model coming in at 160kgs.  I then had it modified to moved the spare up and on the back corner, removed the battery from the drawbar and shuffled some other things to get it a mickey hair under.

It added 5 mins to set up as Id remove spare from top and bike chain it to one wheel, where it acted as a nuisance value wheel clamp.

If you PM me a mobile no I can send you a photo or two.  I just removed mine from gumtree as I am still undecided if I really want to sell it (or at least for the offers I received).
Well, problem solved in my case. I am now the proud owner of a 2008 cub supamatic regal XTD . I believe the towball weight is just under 50kgs so I'll just have to spread the load 50/50 around the axle when packing.

It needs a little TLC;  I believe it was stored outdoors and there's surface rust on chassis,  latches, rivets and screws. Nothing major though and I couldn't be happier with the purchase. It was just within budget and about 10 years younger than I was willing to settle for.

Ideally I wanted a supamatic with the TC Pak as I expect to be travelling on  dirt roads every once so often. It already has an underslung axle, 14" wheels and electric brakes so I think I may be ok if I take it easy.

Does anyone know wat distinguishes a 40th anniversary XTD from the 'normal' supamatic Regal?

I did a 2000k round trip to pick up up last weekend.  First mod: flipping over the tow hitch. Much better sight!

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Offline Kenneth23763

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2006 Supamatic Regal
« Reply #664 on: January 09, 2019, 09:29:34 PM »
Hey Guys

Picked this up just before Christmas and have just got around to opening it up.

It's a Regal with an external kitchen.
The internal fridge works on 240 and will soon test if it works on gas.

The 120AH battery seems kaput so I'll have to replace it.
The current set up is wired to an Anderson Plug and has no facility for other charging so I guess I will now have to investigate solar etc.

The zip around the door needs replacement but is still usable.

I am very happy with the purchase and can't wait to get amongst it.


More questions to follow




Ken

Paralysis by Analysis.

Offline outbackogre

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #665 on: January 10, 2019, 07:29:08 AM »
Looks good Ken.  Enjoy it.  Do a search on zippers.  There are ways of renewing them when they appear to be stuffed.
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Offline jmorgan1981

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #666 on: January 18, 2019, 02:21:16 PM »
Hi

I am currently looking at upgrading from our soft floor to a Cub. We can't decide between the Longreach and Escape. We will be adding the adventure pack to what ever we go and if we go the Escape adding the Longreach kitchen and a boat loader.

Has anyone had experience with the Longreach. The thing that is pushing towards the escape is the inability to put a boat loader on the Longreach (so I've been told) so this means on trips with multiple overnight stays having to unload the racks or not use them which seem like a pain in the bum and a waste of racks.

I see the size having pros and cons. The extra space inside with the chest of drawers setup is awesome. Plus extra storage ontop of the bed for pillows solar panels etc. The other thing is I have two girls 7 & 2 and in ten years the space would be a plus. But then the towing size and setup length. Look I know it is no caravan but if you can have smaller why not.

Anyway feed back on both models (Longreach and escape) would be great.

John

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Offline Smergen

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #667 on: January 18, 2019, 09:36:11 PM »
Hi

I am currently looking at upgrading from our soft floor to a Cub. We can't decide between the Longreach and Escape. We will be adding the adventure pack to what ever we go and if we go the Escape adding the Longreach kitchen and a boat loader.

Has anyone had experience with the Longreach. The thing that is pushing towards the escape is the inability to put a boat loader on the Longreach (so I've been told) so this means on trips with multiple overnight stays having to unload the racks or not use them which seem like a pain in the bum and a waste of racks.

I see the size having pros and cons. The extra space inside with the chest of drawers setup is awesome. Plus extra storage ontop of the bed for pillows solar panels etc. The other thing is I have two girls 7 & 2 and in ten years the space would be a plus. But then the towing size and setup length. Look I know it is no caravan but if you can have smaller why not.

Anyway feed back on both models (Longreach and escape) would be great.

John

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Hi John,
We've recent finished our first shakedown trip in our 2018 Escape. We have 3 kids (11b, 9g, 7b) and have downsized from a 19ft full height van. I ummed and ahhed about the Longreach vs. Escape decision for some time. The benefits you have mentioned of the Longreach are very relevant. However we went with the Escape. For a number of reasons:
1. Payload - Escape has a greater payload (hence the potential for a boat loader)
2. Downsizing - We were focussed on going smaller and lighter to give more confidence and ability off road
3. Swags - The boys love their swags so inside space isn't a premium. Having said that, if the weather turns really south, they can all fit
4. Kitchen - We put the Longreach kitchen on the our Escape. Worth. Every. Cent. Do it if you are getting an Escape.
5. Adventure Pack - If you are keen on offgrid stuff, get the double battery and water. With a small panel, you'll run out of water before power!
6. Boat Loader - one thing I wish I had done was installed one, and then removed it post delivery. That way I would have the brackets if I needed but not the weight if I was going without things that would go on it (bikes, kayaks, etc.)
7. Storage - Granted the LR has a fair chunk more, but remember payload so can carry less. My though is with creative loading, tubs and vehicle storage we should manage no problem. You can always get small draws put in an Escape. We removed the locker box as we wanted more flexibility to use what we want (we have a handy collapsible pantry cupboard that could be a wardrobe on long stays.

Either way mate, they are both rigs. Just work out what's REALLY important and then work out which model meets those requirements. From there, it's time to go with the options list...

Good luck.

Offline jmorgan1981

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #668 on: January 18, 2019, 10:43:37 PM »
Hi John,
We've recent finished our first shakedown trip in our 2018 Escape. We have 3 kids (11b, 9g, 7b) and have downsized from a 19ft full height van. I ummed and ahhed about the Longreach vs. Escape decision for some time. The benefits you have mentioned of the Longreach are very relevant. However we went with the Escape. For a number of reasons:
1. Payload - Escape has a greater payload (hence the potential for a boat loader)
2. Downsizing - We were focussed on going smaller and lighter to give more confidence and ability off road
3. Swags - The boys love their swags so inside space isn't a premium. Having said that, if the weather turns really south, they can all fit
4. Kitchen - We put the Longreach kitchen on the our Escape. Worth. Every. Cent. Do it if you are getting an Escape.
5. Adventure Pack - If you are keen on offgrid stuff, get the double battery and water. With a small panel, you'll run out of water before power!
6. Boat Loader - one thing I wish I had done was installed one, and then removed it post delivery. That way I would have the brackets if I needed but not the weight if I was going without things that would go on it (bikes, kayaks, etc.)
7. Storage - Granted the LR has a fair chunk more, but remember payload so can carry less. My though is with creative loading, tubs and vehicle storage we should manage no problem. You can always get small draws put in an Escape. We removed the locker box as we wanted more flexibility to use what we want (we have a handy collapsible pantry cupboard that could be a wardrobe on long stays.

Either way mate, they are both rigs. Just work out what's REALLY important and then work out which model meets those requirements. From there, it's time to go with the options list...

Good luck.
Smergen

Thanks.

You have given me good for thought. Good point with the payload.

John

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Offline speewa158

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #669 on: February 09, 2019, 11:36:27 AM »
Swaggers l have to Exodus the Cub Club as its time to move on into an Exodus 14 , address NFA  Australia ( No Fixed Abode )   Up for grabs is a Much Loved Supermatic escape tried & tested  PM for details  .  :cheers:
You can go your own way . Treg Up & Make Dust

Offline Kenneth23763

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Supamatic Regal
« Reply #670 on: March 13, 2019, 12:44:47 PM »
Guys

Finally got away for a few days to shake it down.


After my son borrowed it and deployed it in 40+ temperatures I ordered a thermal blanket.
Glad I did as it  noticably cools the sleeping area down.  Yep I could of made do with a tarp over everything but as I plan to mainly camp solo this is an easier solution.

The zips still stuffed and will replace soon.

Battery is on its way out so will replace shrtly and have purchaed a cheap bluetooth monitoring system.

Stove needs some attention as I think I need to change the jets out for something larger to generate more heat.  Also I have the deluxe stove with a grill.  I am sure the grill should have come with an insert, trivet or something?  Any ideas?

To date very happy especially with the quality of the build.  The trailer is 12+ years old and is solid.

Paradise Valley coming up!

Cheers







Ken

Paralysis by Analysis.
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Offline Kenneth23763

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Lost Pole Carrier
« Reply #671 on: April 09, 2019, 05:06:51 PM »
Funny thing happened on the way to Paradise Valley it looks as though I lost my pole carrier between Balwyn and the valley.  Went to set up and no pole carrier and therefore no poles.  You can see the remnants of the pop rivets but that's all. It did not seem loose on my pre travel inspection but it had survived for 13 years over some horrific terrain.

Whilst I am annoyed we lost the poles I am more concerned it did not hit anyone and cause them grief.  I have contacted the police and let them know in case they have a report.


CUB have quoted me $400 to replace the pole set.  Is it really worth it?  I have some 'normal' poles and they will do the job but is their much advantages to the cross bracing that the original set provides?


I also need to replace a tail light due to some miscommunication.  We have now decided that I will reverse the trailer all by myself with no assistance.  Given the driveway this will prove costly as touch is the only method left.  may be a drone.   :D
Ken

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Offline Wukkers

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #672 on: April 09, 2019, 05:47:40 PM »
I was lucky enough to catch my pole carrier when it was half off.  The bracket on one side had come loose.  Tied it up and got home.  Had heavier mounts bolted and new brackets fitted. Not much fun changing the tail lights.  Easier and cheaper to get a reversing camera if your tail lights are at risk often.  Are you talking about poles for the annex?

Offline rockrat

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Re: Lost Pole Carrier
« Reply #673 on: April 09, 2019, 06:12:59 PM »
Funny thing happened on the way to Paradise Valley it looks as though I lost my pole carrier between Balwyn and the valley.  Went to set up and no pole carrier and therefore no poles.  You can see the remnants of the pop rivets but that's all. It did not seem loose on my pre travel inspection but it had survived for 13 years over some horrific terrain.

Whilst I am annoyed we lost the poles I am more concerned it did not hit anyone and cause them grief.  I have contacted the police and let them know in case they have a report.


CUB have quoted me $400 to replace the pole set.  Is it really worth it?  I have some 'normal' poles and they will do the job but is their much advantages to the cross bracing that the original set provides?


I also need to replace a tail light due to some miscommunication.  We have now decided that I will reverse the trailer all by myself with no assistance.  Given the driveway this will prove costly as touch is the only method left.  may be a drone.   :D
Good on you for letting the police know... most people wouldn't give a crap.

Offline Kenneth23763

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Re: The CUB CLUB
« Reply #674 on: April 09, 2019, 07:27:23 PM »
I was lucky enough to catch my pole carrier when it was half off.  The bracket on one side had come loose.  Tied it up and got home.  Had heavier mounts bolted and new brackets fitted. Not much fun changing the tail lights.  Easier and cheaper to get a reversing camera if your tail lights are at risk often.  Are you talking about poles for the annex?

Yep the Annex poles.
From memory there were no external brackets.



Ken

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