Author Topic: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. No more off shore for me.  (Read 44862 times)

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Offline mjharps

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #175 on: November 25, 2015, 11:22:49 PM »
Thanks for sharing. Love the updates! :cheers:
Cheers,
mjharps

Offline Nay-DMAX

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #176 on: November 26, 2015, 07:55:20 PM »
Here is a few action shots of yours truly, hanging out almost over the side sorting out the main umbilical for the wet Bell.





More later....

Still loving the updates Dave such a different everyday life than most live.  Have to say though with these pics not sure if it is just the time of the year but first look I thought why do they have santa suits on haha.

Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #177 on: November 27, 2015, 06:00:10 PM »
not sure if it is just the time of the year but first look I thought why do they have santa suits on haha.

Not quite Santa Suits, more like Circus suits of sorts, my role is the guy who changes everything between the various acts.
I got to share the circus story for you, hope to find time in the morning to type it out seen as I didn't go camping this weekend.
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Offline Nay-DMAX

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #178 on: November 30, 2015, 08:36:07 AM »
Not quite Santa Suits, more like Circus suits of sorts, my role is the guy who changes everything between the various acts.
I got to share the circus story for you, hope to find time in the morning to type it out seen as I didn't go camping this weekend.

Not good on the no camping.  I have loved reading all the things you have put in this thread.


Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #179 on: November 30, 2015, 02:08:27 PM »
I chickened out on camping thanks to a dicky knee and the weather forcast.
Whimp i know...


I shall now try to explain some of what can only be described as a circus for you.
Sadly, no pics, but I am sure you can picture stupidity for yourselves.

Names are being left out to protect the stupid etc etc.

The job we were doing was to do inspections on the existing oil or gas pipes which are Sub Sea, below the sea bed. The pipes are lengths of steel pipe and have concrete weight coat around the outside to make them heavy and to ensure they don’t float up.

Oil companies conduct periodical inspections on these pipes with a variety of methods, an easy method is to send some thing down along the pipe which is known as a “Pig”. One of these Pigs is a tool which is sent along the inside of the pipe and can measures the wall thickness and reports any concerns.
This type of check had been done recently and some concerns were identified.
The oil company then finds various contractors with the specialist tools to do the additional checks and rectification works.
For me, I work for a company which has the diving ship and divers. The special tools are from 3rd party contractors.
The 3rd party contractors on this job were all found by the oil company.
There were 3 of these 3rd party contractors which make up the circus story.

1.   The 1st company were on-board to provide various bit of general machinery, which they hire in for the occasion, and then they find guys from around the place and put it all together on-board and send them out to make it work. The machines were 650 cfm (cubic foot per min @ 10 bar) compressors, grit blaster and various hydraulic power packs. The 2 guys they sent were nice blokes, but were stuck trying to make rubbish work. The equipment is not checked in the yards before being sent away. The thing is, the yards where this equipment is found is in the US of A, we were in Trinidad. Out of all the equipment supplied by this company, only the most basic hand tool or hose reel functioned. EVERYTHING else was in need of repairs to make it function.
This is where I come in, as a dive tech, remember there are a few of us, we get the call on the phone to attend the deck and make what ever it is work. So this recent project, it was me out 4 nights a week to sort rubbish out. I’d be robbing stuff from one machine or joining other machines together. Remember the wonderful bush mechanics show on the telle with the guys sorting cars out in the bush, that’s me, in the multi gazillion $ oil industry. These machines I am referring to are what can be found on any large building site in Aus, but would never be allowed on site due to be crap.

2.   The 2nd act of the circus is a mob of 6 hill billies from gawd only knows where in the US. They were on-board to oversee a special tool which cuts an exact length of weight coat from around the pipe outer surface with out causing any damage. These guys are over paid specialists technicians in the use of this 1 tool. They spent 3 weeks on-board the vessel loitering in the TV lounge rooms hogging all the couches; they were the 1st in the mess room and due to where they are from, the loudest sods by far.
Twice a day at the various project meetings they were asked if the equipment was ready and fit for use?
The answer was always Yes, and for 3 weeks it was the same thing each day.
Until we went to use it………
Nothing worked.
They had no idea how to operate it.
It was then discovered it was the wrong equipment.
The tool is a hydraulically driven motor powering a cutting disc, it needs large volume of oil, at low pressures. It was connected to hose which is far too small for the job, a ½” rather then ¾” and there is 300 meters of it. So to compensate for the small hose, they turned the pressures from the pump up to max.
This caused the oil to overheat, all 1,000 litres of it, to the point where it was boiling in the tank and we had a full blown fire drill out on the back deck. Best thing is, on top of this over temp oil tank is the 100 litre fuel tank. Thankfully it was just a drill where us regular vessel crew guys got prepared for the possible outcomes.
Now, ya don’t get this sort of fun in normal sensible work places do you?
It was over to me to sort it out, plugging their equipment into other machines, building a cooling system which meant hanging a long length of hose over the side of the ship, and just typical “She’ll be right” sorting of stuff out.
Funny thing is, the first hour of this gear being in the water, the boss called me up and asked to meet in the dive control room. I showed up to find him very unhappy, he asked if I could attend the back deck to sort it all out, and throw these guys over the side.
In the world of hydraulics, no matter what your language or culture is, there is a uniform code for various functions in Hydraulics, the most basic 5 are: Pressure line = P, Return or Tank line = “T”, bleed off lines or control lines back to tank = “D” then the thing your controlling from the valve is either A or B, that is up or down.
Well it was this until I had to work with these yanks. Pressure is now apparently A, I can’t begin to describe how much that confuses things when trying to communicate over the top of loud engines.
The specialist tools they sent out to the job were not compatible at all, think of it like this. Take a Great looking Kia Family Wagon, 25’ of bushmaster offroad caravan, and a standard 750 kg garden trailer tow coupling. Each are a great bit of kit in the correct use, but try to join all 3 together and then drive the CSR. It aint goona happen, well, that is what this specialist company had supplied for the job.

3.   The 3rd and final act comes from some folk who provide a tool which clamps the outside of the pipe to add some strength and then a special adhesive in injected inside this clamp holding it all in place. These guys, 2 of them, had 2 weeks resting in the Hyat Hotel, which has an infinity pool with bar, on full $ per day whilst waiting to load the equipment from the key side to the vessel.
There was 2 weeks to check it out, make sure it is there, make sure it works, make sure they know how to use it.
     Guess what???
     Getting the picture???
No, it didn’t work, nor did they know how to sort it out, nor did they check if everything is there. A Vital bit of specialist gear was left behind back in the UK.
These guys managed to overheat a hydraulic machine as well, giving us another fire drill……

Welcome to the world of offshore work, please don’t ask why it is this way, but if the average citizen knew about the $ being wasted they’d be horrified.
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Offline briann532

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #180 on: November 30, 2015, 03:53:05 PM »
So what you're telling us..........

Even in a cool job you still have to put up with ummm.........other types of humans!

Love the thread. Interesting stuff.
Back to a swag!
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Offline WilSurf

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #181 on: November 30, 2015, 04:30:04 PM »
Sounds familiar.
That's we have our own little vessel.
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Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #182 on: November 30, 2015, 04:52:43 PM »
Even in a cool job you still have to put up with ummm.........other types of humans!

Humans? I wish.....
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Offline db

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #183 on: December 01, 2015, 11:52:38 AM »
So, do these rocket scientists still get paid? At least you weren't bored.  ;D
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Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #184 on: December 01, 2015, 12:07:26 PM »
So, do these rocket scientists still get paid?

yep, a motza!!

At least you weren't bored.  ;D

I'd start my day by asking the deck foreman what this days entertainment will be.
Admittedly I am not known for my diplomacy when it comes to idiots, there was a day there when I got the call up to deck and the lads grabbed me and asked to go easy on 1 of them as they thought he was about to cry and when he heard I was on the way he started a melt down of sorts. So i told him to ummm, go away whilst I sorted his kit once .................. again.
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Offline Proudy

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #185 on: December 01, 2015, 01:56:48 PM »

I hated those SBMs and SPMs.
Close to shore but too far away to get ashore.   :'(
Our vessel was too large to get closer.
Brings back good memories, especially the Caribbean.
Did one trip there: Trinidad, Jamaica, Ponta Cardon, Willemstad, Havanah, Mantanzas......
Nice rum there.
Hi wilSurf
That looks like a shell tanker. What's the name of that ship. I've been a merchant Seafarer on the cost for a bit over 20 years now.  SPMs never much fun.


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Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #186 on: January 11, 2016, 10:11:37 PM »
Back at the pickle factory again after a nice Christmas at home.
Sadly I just spent hours finding away to add pics but the inet is not co-opperating.

We've left Trinidad and are due to sail back to Scotland..... BUT
A devopling trypocial cyclone in the middle of the Atlantic in our way is goona be a party pooper for the trip, so, it seems we may have to go hide in Barbados for a few days.
Oh what a shame.
Me, Na, no chance, don't see it myself, the big boys in the office will tell us to keep going around the cyclone, or go somewhere else which is less glamerous.
One thing in a favour is we don't have enough go go juice for long windy road type trip nth, we are already calling into the Azores for fuel.

So folks, I'm doing the "Please take me to Barbados dance" at the moment.
May not be working though, as I type, we've stopped moving and are just bobbing around somere of the nth east cost of Tobago.

I don't want to go work in the snow, I wanna stay in the tropics......

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Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #187 on: January 20, 2016, 03:58:44 AM »
So much for Barbados...
Sadly we went within 5 miles of it, then were refused port entry due to too many tourist boats.

We were on our way back to the snowed in Scotland, stooging along behind a big storm in the Atlantic.
Reached the halfway mark, near the Azores, sadly without calling in, the weather is getting cooler, my moaning about the snow has begun.
And then…
We stop.
In the midst of 5 m seas, we’ve been stopped for most of the arvo now waiting……
Waiting for the office and oil company to decide on us going back to Trinidad or not

Bit of a circus isn’t it, we’ve just had 11 days of stooging north, burning 26 tonnes of fuel per 24 hour period.
Now, we’re likely to go back, at a faster pace, into the weather, and burn about 35 tonnes per day.

Still waiting as I type.
I don't want to work in the snow again....
Everything hurts    >:(

Sadly, I can't share any pics, inet isn't working well enough for that.
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Offline speewa158

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #188 on: January 20, 2016, 05:19:38 AM »
Sounds like " SNAFU "  situation normal all farked up .

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Offline Fizzie

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #189 on: January 20, 2016, 07:05:11 AM »
Hey Dave, did they ever find your luggage, or are you still wearing the same clothes?  :D  :-[
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Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #190 on: March 14, 2016, 07:33:58 PM »
I've been promoted.
Look out, desk jockey for me it is now.
I got pics of my flash new office, but I can't get them to load and share on the net.
So the biggest worry for me now is needing to read through the weight loss group thread  ;D
I was clocking up 11,000 meters a day walking about the boat.

The new job is the Dive Technical Supervisor, this means I need to ensure all is in order for the bubble heads to go for a swim. There is a bit more to it but that is it in a nut shell.
Have done this before and enjoyed it. This has come at a good time for me and the family as there are massive cut backs in the entire oil industry now. We have gone from a crew of 7 to 3. I was a bit worred for a while there about money, now this helps a lot.
Just got to sell my CT and then the wife may even get her big palace after all.... ;D


Hey Dave, did they ever find your luggage, or are you still wearing the same clothes?  :D  :-[

yep, I got it, then can you believe they lost my bag again this trip. Took 5 days to get it from London to Aberdeen....
Love my job.

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Offline Fizzie

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. Look out!, I've been promoted.....
« Reply #191 on: March 15, 2016, 07:17:44 AM »
Congratulations on the promotion Dave  :cup:

When you get home, you'll have to get someone else to do all your CT work - without the practice, you won't remember how to use tools any more  >:D
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Offline Johnnos3003

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #192 on: March 15, 2016, 07:45:23 AM »

Welcome to the world of offshore work, please don’t ask why it is this way, but if the average citizen knew about the $ being wasted they’d be horrified.

Haha I think any one that has worked in Heavy industry knows how much cash is wasted and it is horrific!

Congrats on the promotion hopefully you don't miss being on the tools too much.

Offline WilSurf

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #193 on: March 15, 2016, 12:33:29 PM »
Hi wilSurf
That looks like a shell tanker. What's the name of that ship. I've been a merchant Seafarer on the cost for a bit over 20 years now.  SPMs never much fun.


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Sorry for my late reply, didn't see it until now.
Yes it was a Shell tanker. That particular trip was on the Entalina. That was a little conventional product tanker which carried Avgas, Avtur, A1 jet fuel, Mogas etc.
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Offline GBC

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #194 on: March 15, 2016, 01:53:17 PM »
I chickened out on camping thanks to a dicky knee and the weather forcast.
Whimp i know...


I shall now try to explain some of what can only be described as a circus for you.
Sadly, no pics, but I am sure you can picture stupidity for yourselves.

Names are being left out to protect the stupid etc etc.

The job we were doing was to do inspections on the existing oil or gas pipes which are Sub Sea, below the sea bed. The pipes are lengths of steel pipe and have concrete weight coat around the outside to make them heavy and to ensure they don’t float up.

Oil companies conduct periodical inspections on these pipes with a variety of methods, an easy method is to send some thing down along the pipe which is known as a “Pig”. One of these Pigs is a tool which is sent along the inside of the pipe and can measures the wall thickness and reports any concerns.
This type of check had been done recently and some concerns were identified.
The oil company then finds various contractors with the specialist tools to do the additional checks and rectification works.
For me, I work for a company which has the diving ship and divers. The special tools are from 3rd party contractors.
The 3rd party contractors on this job were all found by the oil company.
There were 3 of these 3rd party contractors which make up the circus story.

1.   The 1st company were on-board to provide various bit of general machinery, which they hire in for the occasion, and then they find guys from around the place and put it all together on-board and send them out to make it work. The machines were 650 cfm (cubic foot per min @ 10 bar) compressors, grit blaster and various hydraulic power packs. The 2 guys they sent were nice blokes, but were stuck trying to make rubbish work. The equipment is not checked in the yards before being sent away. The thing is, the yards where this equipment is found is in the US of A, we were in Trinidad. Out of all the equipment supplied by this company, only the most basic hand tool or hose reel functioned. EVERYTHING else was in need of repairs to make it function.
This is where I come in, as a dive tech, remember there are a few of us, we get the call on the phone to attend the deck and make what ever it is work. So this recent project, it was me out 4 nights a week to sort rubbish out. I’d be robbing stuff from one machine or joining other machines together. Remember the wonderful bush mechanics show on the telle with the guys sorting cars out in the bush, that’s me, in the multi gazillion $ oil industry. These machines I am referring to are what can be found on any large building site in Aus, but would never be allowed on site due to be crap.

2.   The 2nd act of the circus is a mob of 6 hill billies from gawd only knows where in the US. They were on-board to oversee a special tool which cuts an exact length of weight coat from around the pipe outer surface with out causing any damage. These guys are over paid specialists technicians in the use of this 1 tool. They spent 3 weeks on-board the vessel loitering in the TV lounge rooms hogging all the couches; they were the 1st in the mess room and due to where they are from, the loudest sods by far.
Twice a day at the various project meetings they were asked if the equipment was ready and fit for use?
The answer was always Yes, and for 3 weeks it was the same thing each day.
Until we went to use it………
Nothing worked.
They had no idea how to operate it.
It was then discovered it was the wrong equipment.
The tool is a hydraulically driven motor powering a cutting disc, it needs large volume of oil, at low pressures. It was connected to hose which is far too small for the job, a ½” rather then ¾” and there is 300 meters of it. So to compensate for the small hose, they turned the pressures from the pump up to max.
This caused the oil to overheat, all 1,000 litres of it, to the point where it was boiling in the tank and we had a full blown fire drill out on the back deck. Best thing is, on top of this over temp oil tank is the 100 litre fuel tank. Thankfully it was just a drill where us regular vessel crew guys got prepared for the possible outcomes.
Now, ya don’t get this sort of fun in normal sensible work places do you?
It was over to me to sort it out, plugging their equipment into other machines, building a cooling system which meant hanging a long length of hose over the side of the ship, and just typical “She’ll be right” sorting of stuff out.
Funny thing is, the first hour of this gear being in the water, the boss called me up and asked to meet in the dive control room. I showed up to find him very unhappy, he asked if I could attend the back deck to sort it all out, and throw these guys over the side.
In the world of hydraulics, no matter what your language or culture is, there is a uniform code for various functions in Hydraulics, the most basic 5 are: Pressure line = P, Return or Tank line = “T”, bleed off lines or control lines back to tank = “D” then the thing your controlling from the valve is either A or B, that is up or down.
Well it was this until I had to work with these yanks. Pressure is now apparently A, I can’t begin to describe how much that confuses things when trying to communicate over the top of loud engines.
The specialist tools they sent out to the job were not compatible at all, think of it like this. Take a Great looking Kia Family Wagon, 25’ of bushmaster offroad caravan, and a standard 750 kg garden trailer tow coupling. Each are a great bit of kit in the correct use, but try to join all 3 together and then drive the CSR. It aint goona happen, well, that is what this specialist company had supplied for the job.

3.   The 3rd and final act comes from some folk who provide a tool which clamps the outside of the pipe to add some strength and then a special adhesive in injected inside this clamp holding it all in place. These guys, 2 of them, had 2 weeks resting in the Hyat Hotel, which has an infinity pool with bar, on full $ per day whilst waiting to load the equipment from the key side to the vessel.
There was 2 weeks to check it out, make sure it is there, make sure it works, make sure they know how to use it.
     Guess what???
     Getting the picture???
No, it didn’t work, nor did they know how to sort it out, nor did they check if everything is there. A Vital bit of specialist gear was left behind back in the UK.
These guys managed to overheat a hydraulic machine as well, giving us another fire drill……

Welcome to the world of offshore work, please don’t ask why it is this way, but if the average citizen knew about the $ being wasted they’d be horrified.

Haha just found this post. I spent a good few years on and off the MV Cape Grafton (Now MV Southern Supporter), building navaids, deploying buoys, underwater concrete pours and running suction dredges on hookah, carrying out maintenance on lighthouses etc. When you have helicopters flying around with concrete kibbles, larcs carrying hydraulic batching plants and mountains of hired equipment to make work it always invariably ends up as a Shit fight. And the seat shiners back on land on the sat phone "you know this is costing $150k a day, you've got to make it work blah blah blah"
Your post just took me straight back 15 years. Enjoy your Shit fight :)
« Last Edit: March 15, 2016, 01:55:34 PM by GBC »

Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. Look out!, I've been promoted.....
« Reply #195 on: November 10, 2018, 06:19:44 AM »
Well fellow Swaggers.
It has been a while now for this thread, but seen as it was popular I thought I'd dig it up once again so I can say SORRY in advance.

It seems my photos are possibly going to go the way of the Dodo and other photo sharing sites.

Given I don't have the time to hook the Van up and go away, I wont have the time to fix threads such as this. As i no longer work in this industry, I can't do it at work either.
I'll keep an eye out for a way around this, but for now I can only say sorry as it is a bit of a shame for things like this to happen.
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Offline McTavish

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. No more off shore for me.
« Reply #196 on: November 15, 2018, 10:31:16 PM »
Thanks for this thread.   The photos do take us to a place most will never see or even think about as we put around in our little steel cages.   Shame if they disappear - but good reading again.   I'm assuming you're not keen to join the game again?   
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Offline sparksy

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #197 on: November 16, 2018, 10:01:28 AM »
Haha just found this post. I spent a good few years on and off the MV Cape Grafton (Now MV Southern Supporter), building navaids, deploying buoys, underwater concrete pours and running suction dredges on hookah, carrying out maintenance on lighthouses etc. When you have helicopters flying around with concrete kibbles, larcs carrying hydraulic batching plants and mountains of hired equipment to make work it always invariably ends up as a Shit fight. And the seat shiners back on land on the sat phone "you know this is costing $150k a day, you've got to make it work blah blah blah"
Your post just took me straight back 15 years. Enjoy your Shit fight :)
I used to work for the lighthouse service back in the 80's.  I was a Mechanic Maritime Aids ( electrical) and  used to travel on the Cape Don along the west coast .Fondly enjoy those time as well as seeing parts of the state by road and helicopter that even today is hard to see.

Offline DaveR

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. No more off shore for me.
« Reply #198 on: November 16, 2018, 01:32:02 PM »
  I'm assuming you're not keen to join the game again?
Yep, never again, the flights were killing me. It took 3 days for me to recover when getting home which is hard when there are small folk wanting to jump all over me.
I found how to keep my pics on the host site, I just have to delete 395 to get it below 1,000 all up and then they will be saved.
May have to lose my CT thread perhaps..... ?
2001 HDJ-100, a flash one
2013 Expanda OB

Offline GBC

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Re: Walk-a-bout at work with a camera. In the Caribbean
« Reply #199 on: November 17, 2018, 05:26:31 AM »
I used to work for the lighthouse service back in the 80's.  I was a Mechanic Maritime Aids ( electrical) and  used to travel on the Cape Don along the west coast .Fondly enjoy those time as well as seeing parts of the state by road and helicopter that even today is hard to see.
Yes they put navaids in some interesting places. I enjoyed my time but it is a single blokes game. We were often over 180 field days a year, double and triple swings depending on blokes booking off crook and work etc.