Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10
1
WHEN WORKING OUT HOW MUCH BEER TO TAKE...

YOUR BETTER OFF LOOKING AT IT THAN LOOKING FOR IT!!



 :cup: :cheers: :cup: :cheers: :cup: :cheers: :cup: :cheers: :cup: :cheers:
2
General Discussion / Re: What did you do in your shed / man cave today?
« Last post by Rumpig on Today at 03:41:58 PM »
Rumpig, that's one hell of a battery bank, how many amp hours?
looks better then it is....each battery is only 35AH (originals were 33AH) equals 210AH all up, it's the way Kimberley did it for some reason. Sadly the size of the area behind the draw the batteries are in limits what you can put back in there, so easier just to replace like for like...the old batteries would be atleast 5 years old now. Not a cheap exercise, over $700 in batteries there :'( :'(
3
General Discussion / Re: An interesting read
« Last post by Rumpig on Today at 03:37:46 PM »
When I saw the title I thought ****in kill me.  >:(

Then I read it and the first paragraph hit the nail on the head of our xmas party the last 3-4yrs. Our snooze fest is preceded by an email from HR that kills any chance of enjoyment, fun, letting hair down, or want to go to the party  :-[ :'( :'( :'( :-[
our Xmas party was last Friday night at The German Club....dinner paid for (whatever we wanted) and I drank Bundy all night long, aswell as the builder i work for bought us all funny looking German hats at the bar aswell. When the plumbers apprentice got us kicked out of there for being drunk after he knocked a glass over, we headed to The Storey Bridge Hotel where more Bundy was bought for me, eventually we got kicked out at 2 a.m as it was closing time....not a bad night out.  You can have your office job mate :cheers:
4
General Discussion / Re: What did you do in your shed / man cave today?
« Last post by Pottsy on Today at 03:37:00 PM »
Rumpig, that's one hell of a battery bank, how many amp hours?
5
Might go 110 ltr, just so mines bigger  ;D

Mark

FRIDGE ENVY!!!!
6
General Discussion / Re: What did you do in your shed / man cave today?
« Last post by Rumpig on Today at 03:28:24 PM »
Out with the old, in with the new
7
General Discussion / Re: An interesting read
« Last post by Pottsy on Today at 03:28:18 PM »
Political correctness strikes again, it is now trendy to be offended on someone else's behalf even if it didn't offend the target!
Great article in a nameless online 4wd magazine where a bloke proffered Good morning ladies to a group of women only to be challenged as to how dare he presume they were ladies, he responded after her tirade, Good Morning Dragons! Lol!
8
General Discussion / Re: In the market for caravan - overwhelming
« Last post by glenm64 on Today at 03:23:13 PM »
I reckon the most important bit of info thats been stated already is
the GMV. Our kerb weights are around 2T. I got a Dmax and if you reckon your gonna pull 3t van safely, well we have different concepts on safety.
I pull a 2.2T loaded van and thats plenty. It scares me seeing what some people pull. Either buy a tug to suit the van or a van to suit the tug. All this manufacturers hype on huge towing capacity for what are really mid size 4wds is bordering on criminal, of course all this is just my humble opinion.



Cheers Glen

9
"Let's go camping, It'll be fun..............."

10
General Discussion / An interesting read
« Last post by Bird on Today at 03:05:39 PM »
When I saw the title I thought ****in kill me.  >:(

Then I read it and the first paragraph hit the nail on the head of our xmas party the last 3-4yrs. Our snooze fest is preceded by an email from HR that kills any chance of enjoyment, fun, letting hair down, or want to go to the party  :-[ :'( :'( :'( :-[

Quote
A friend is imploring his employer to ditch this year's Christmas party. Not because he hates the joint or his colleagues, but because the party has become so politically correct it feels like another boring work function.


The party used to start early on Thursday evening and extend well into the night. The company paid for everything. There was an unwritten rule that staff came to work a little later on Friday and left earlier. There was always some gossip and plenty of fun (those crazy accountants!).

For the past few years, his firm's party has been at lunchtime on Wednesday. Staff pay for their drinks. Most return to work by mid-afternoon, for appearances. Conversation is stilted. The biggest scandal is someone ordering a light beer.


Worse, staff receive multiple emails from the HR department in the lead-up to the party, reminding them of their responsibilities and the firm's expectations. The party starts to resemble a wake, where staff mourn the death of workplace fun.


"It's excruciating," my friend complained. "Christmas parties used to be great. Ours has become so dull that it's not worth going to." Fewer staff are attending each year because they are supposedly "snowed with work", he says.


I understand companies putting the clamps on Christmas parties. There's too much reputational, legal and financial risk from drunken staff who forget the party is at a workplace and that usual occupational health and safety rules, and company expectations, apply. No employee should face or tolerate inappropriate behaviour at their firm's party.


That said, being too risk averse about Christmas parties defeats their purpose. A good party rewards staff for hard work, celebrates success and motivates people. It brings employees together in one room, some of whom rarely meet face-to-face.


In some ways, a good Christmas party has never been so important. As more staff communicate online, hot-desk, work remotely or are buried in mobile devices all day, the chance to get together in person – even if just once a year at the Christmas party – is valuable.


Also, as companies restrain wages growth and expect staff to work longer for the same or less pay, a Christmas party is one way to reward staff without pay rises. Done well, it is a useful contributor to office morale and organisation culture.


A bad party can do harm. I recall an employer who decided employees should pay for their meal, after the firm made record profits that year. Staff complained.


Holding the party at lunchtime and expecting staff to return to work soon afterwards is equally annoying. The flexibility to take a few hours off work during or after the party, within reason, was a way to thank employees for their efforts. Now, staff feel a shortened Christmas party is a yet another way for employers to squeeze them.


Perhaps the biggest loss is not being able to talk to your boss, their boss or a manager of another department in an informal setting. There's nothing worse than being stuck at a boring table and making awkward small-talk with colleagues over lunch. So much for the benefits of company networking at the Christmas party.


Again, I won't downplay the risks of poorly organised Christmas parties. Companies that provide too much alcohol, for too long, and do not monitor behaviour at the event or consider how staff will get home, must share the blame if things go wrong.


The protection and welfare of every staff member at Christmas parties must be paramount in the event's planning. One person being harassed by an alcohol-fuelled moron is one too many and ample evidence why companies should limit their party.


But there's always a risk that companies go too far and become a "nanny state". They forget that 99 per cent of staff do the right thing, treat each other with respect and know which boundaries cannot be crossed at the Christmas party. And that the other 1 per cent can be managed in the lead-up to the event or monitored during it.


With good corporate communication before the party, staff can understand the risks, adapt their behaviour if needed, monitor their colleagues and take early action at the first sign of problems.  And still have some workplace fun.

http://www.theleader.com.au/story/5049656/is-it-time-to-kill-the-office-christmas-party/?cs=2011
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10